Exercise with lumbago and sciatica

It is like a shot in your back and you can not go any further. What now? Sometimes there is a few days to get into activities again. Literally, movement is important to get rid of the complaint. Painkillers can also help temporarily but differs from person to person. If you are nevertheless looking for a safe exercise, you can look further here even though success is not always guaranteed.

See also the articles on lumbago and sciaticacauses of low back pain and signpost for low back pain for more information.

  

1- Lie down in a posture that causes few complaints. This may take a while. Sometimes there is no posture to be found. Then lie on the back, with the lower legs on an elevation, for example a set of cushions. The intention is to relax. Breathe quietly from the lower abdomen.

2- Lie on the stomach, possibly with one or more cushions under the belly. If after a while the worst pain is gone, the cushions can be removed one by one. Every step with the belly down takes time: take that time.

3- Lie down on the abdomen in elbow support, try to relax feet, legs, buttocks and back and keep them low on the ground. Keep this up for a few minutes. Practice once every two hours. If this does not work, then more time is needed, then go back to step 2.

4- Pushing in the prone position: place the hands under the shoulders on the ground. Stretch the elbows and push the upper body slowly upwards (see photo for final position). Then slowly lay down again. Let the back sag while stretching the elbows: every muscle tension gives unnecessary extra complaints. Do this 10 times, once every two hours, or more often if it is effective.

 

Note: If this does not help in the first two days or complaints are aggravating, then this exercise is not suitable for you.

Note: This exercise can not be a substitute for a visit to an expert doctor. In case of doubt and serious complaints: please consult him/her!

  

Oefening bij spit en ischias

  

Reference
McKenzie RA, May S. The Lumbar Spine. Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy. (Vol. 1 and 2) Spinal Publications, 2nd Edition, 2003.